Employment

Unemployment Insurance Initial Claims

What: Unemployment Insurance (UI) Initial Claims are the number of people who have filed a claim after a separation from an employer, requesting determination of eligibility for the UI program.

Why: Initial claims are a leading indicator that are sensitive to emerging labor market trends. The comparison with the 2019 Weekly Average shows how many times greater the weekly claims were than the average for the weekly claims in 2019.


Source: Colorado Department of Labor and EmploymentFrequency: weekly, 2-week delayUpdated: 01/01/2021

Unemployment Insurance Continued Claims

What: Unemployment Insurance (UI) Continued Claims is the number of people who have already filed an initial claim and who have experienced a week of unemployment and then filed a continued claim to claim benefits for that week of unemployment. Continued claims data are based on the week of unemployment, not the week when the initial claim was filed.

Why: Continued Claims represents the total number of individuals claiming benefits any given week, not just the newly unemployed. The comparison with the 2019 Weekly Average shows how many times greater the weekly claims were than the average for the weekly claims in 2019. For example, during the week ending May 2, the number of continued claims in Larimer County were 18 times greater than the 2019 weekly average.


Source: Colorado Department of Labor and EmploymentFrequency: weekly, 2-week delayUpdated: 01/01/2021

Unemployment Rate

What: The unemployment rate measures the percent of people who are jobless, looking for a job, and available for work as a percent of the labor force.

Why: The unemployment rate is an indicator of access to economic opportunity. High unemployment represents a loss of jobs and a loss of income, which impacts economic self-sufficiency and influences consumer expenditures.


Source: US Bureau of Labor Statistics Frequency: monthly, 2-month delayUpdated: 01/29/2021

Labor Force

What: The labor force consists of the employed (people with jobs) and the unemployed (people who are jobless, looking for a job, and available for work).

Why: Changes in the labor force can measure workers’ desire and ability to work. During normal years, the labor force is fairly stable. However, during this pandemic, workers not only face increased uncertainty about their prospects of finding but also must consider factors such as health risk, vulnerability, and childcare when deciding whether or not to participate in the labor force.


Source: US Bureau of Labor Statistics Frequency: monthly, 2-month delayUpdated: 01/29/2021

Unique Job Postings

What: The job postings in this dataset are those considered to be unique and “active,” meaning they are currently available online and are open for applications.

Why: Job postings are a leading indicator of emerging labor market trends. They are a measure of recruitment marketing by employers purportedly looking to fill job vacancies. Higher levels of job posting activity can be indicative of heightened hiring activity in a labor market and vice versa.


Source: Emsi.Frequency: monthly, no delayUpdated: 01/29/2021